The afterlives of specimens

science, mourning, and Whitman"s Civil War
  • 254 Pages
  • 4.55 MB
  • 2304 Downloads
  • English
by
Knowledge, Dead in literature, Anatomy, Dead, Death in literature, Literature and medicine, Medicine, Human body in literature, Literature and science, Human anatomy, Hi
StatementLindsay Tuggle
SeriesThe Iowa Whitman series, Iowa Whitman series
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPS3242.B58 T84 2017
The Physical Object
Paginationxi, 254 pages
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL26974663M
ISBN 10160938539X
ISBN 139781609385392
LC Control Number2017005979
OCLC/WorldCa983824370

“This is an exciting book. From the opening claim that Whitman’s word ‘specimen’ is etymologically grounded in voyeurism, Afterlives of Specimens is arresting in its -researched and original, it makes a major contribution to Whitman studies while also contributing to Civil War history and to our understanding of the intersection of science and mourning.”—Kenneth Price.

The Afterlives of Specimens explores the space between science and sentiment, the historical moment when the human cadaver became both lost love object and subject of anatomical Whitman witnessed rapid changes in relations between the living and the dead.

In the space of a few decades, dissection evolved from a posthumous punishment inflicted on criminals to/5. The Afterlives of Specimens explores the space between science and sentiment, the historical moment when the human cadaver became both lost love object and subject of anatomical violence.

Walt Whitman witnessed rapid changes in relations between the living and the dead. In the space of a few decades, dissection evolved from a posthumous punishment inflicted on criminals to Author: Lindsay Tuggle. The Afterlives of Specimens explores the space between science and sentiment, the historical moment when the human cadaver became both lost love object and subject of anatomical violence.

Walt Whitman witnessed rapid changes in relations between the living and the dead. In the space of a few decades, dissection evolved from a posthumous punishment inflicted on criminals to an element of Cited by: 1. The Afterlives of Specimens explores the space between science and sentiment, the historical moment when the human cadaver became both lost love object and subject of anatomical violence.

Walt Whitman witnessed rapid changes in relations between the living and the dead/5(6). The Afterlives of Specimens by Lindsay Tuggle Book Resume: The Afterlives of Specimens explores the space between science and sentiment, the historical moment when the human cadaver became both lost love object and subject of anatomical violence.

Walt Whitman witnessed rapid changes in relations between the living and the dead. “This is an exciting book. From the opening claim that Whitman’s word ‘specimen’ is etymologically grounded in voyeurism, Afterlives of Specimens is arresting in its -researched and original, it makes a major contribution to Whitman studies while also contributing to Civil War history and to our understanding of the intersection of science and mourning.”—Kenneth Price.

I hadn't come across Lindsay Tuggle's The Afterlives of Specimens before in my scanning of publisher Fall/Winter catalogs or other sources. Part of the University of Iowa Press's Iowa Whitman series, the book " explores the space between science and sentiment, the historical moment when the human cadaver became both lost love object and subject.

This is a peculiar book, and I liked it but I'm not quite sure what to make of it. From the start I found the narrator offputting, but whenever I thought I might as well give up, something hooked me and pulled me back in – a story about a ghost on a staircase that's titled 'The Tale of the Dog on Fire'; an organisation called 'the Church of Search' which has holograms giving inspirational /5().

The “afterlives of specimens” in Tuggle’s title, then, refer to the continuing presence of bodies or body parts, either as phantom limbs, preserved corpses, museum exhibits, or traumatic sights of war that haunted Whitman.

At times, Tuggle suggests that Whitman conflates the spiritual with the physical. The Afterlives of Specimens explores the space between science and sentiment, the historical moment when the human cadaver became both lost love object and subject of anatomical Whitman witnessed rapid changes in relations between the living and the dead.

In the space of a few decades, dissection evolved from a posthumous punishment inflicted on criminals to Reviews: 1. The Afterlives of Specimens explores the space between science and sentiment, the historical moment when the human cadaver became both lost love object and subject of anatomical violence.

Description The afterlives of specimens EPUB

Walt Whitman witnessed rapid changes in relations between the living and the dead. In the space of a few decades, dissection evolved from a posthumous punishment inflicted on criminals to Reviews: 1.

About the Book "The Afterlives of Specimens explores the space between science and sentiment, the historical moment when the human cadaver became both lost love object and subject of anatomical violence.

Walt Whitman witnessed rapid changes in relations between the living and the dead. In the space of a few decades, dissection evolved from a.

Book Description: The Afterlives of Specimensexplores the space between science and sentiment, the historical moment when the human cadaver became both lost love object and subject of anatomical Whitman witnessed rapid changes in relations between the living and the dead.

In the space of a few decades, dissection evolved from a posthumous punishment inflicted on criminals to an.

The Afterlives of Roland Barthes is the first book to revisit and reassess Barthes' thought in light of these posthumously published writings. Covering work such as Barthes' Mourning Diary, the notes for his projected Vita Nova and many writings yet to be translated into English, Neil Badmington reveals a very different Barthes of today than.

The book acts as medium for a collective haunting, home to "countless" "phantoms" whose "dust and bones" were relocated to the National Cemeteries.

The exhumation and reburial of their bodies reflect the diasporic afterlives of Civil War specimens. The New York Review of Books reviews The Afterlives of Specimens. Davis S. Reynolds writes: "The preservation, exhumation, and exhibition of human remains become, in the hands of the literary critic Lindsay Tuggle, an illuminating basis for a provocative reassessment of.

The specimens listed in this document are those that may need to be collected to detect the etiologic agent during a respiratory disease outbreak. When a specific pathogen is known or very strongly suspected, specimen collection should be tailored to the pathogen (Appendix A).

Details The afterlives of specimens PDF

In The Afterlives of Specimens, literary critic and poet Lindsay Tuggle excavates Whitman’s Civil War writing to animate new readings of mourning and preservation in mid nineteenth-century beautifully dense and multi-layered prose, she attends to the “specimen” (a term used in Darwin’s The Origin of Species inone year prior to its first appearance in Leaves of Grass.

Get this from a library. The afterlives of specimens: science, mourning, and Whitman's Civil War. [Lindsay Tuggle] -- "The Afterlives of Specimens explores the space between science and sentiment, the historical moment when the human cadaver became both. Afterlives of Specimens: Science, Mourning, and Whitman's Civil War, Paperba Sign in to check out Check out as guest.

Adding to your cart. The item you've selected was not added to your cart. Add to cart. Add to Watchlist Unwatch A book that looks new but has been read. Cover has no visible wear, and the dust jacket (if applicable) is Seller Rating: % positive. The Afterlives of Specimens: Science, Mourning, and Whitman’s.

Civil War. University of Iowa Press, $ ISBN Lindsay Tuggle’s. The Afterlives of Specimens. offers a provocative, interdisciplinary analysis of Walt Whitman’s Civil War writings that examines the. The Afterlives is an admirably straight-faced novel, and Pierce writes as if he's allergic to the snide, the ironic and the pseudo-intellectual.

It's a deeply generous, compassionate book that. - Explore rhc99x's board "Type Specimen Books" on Pinterest. See more ideas about Specimen, Type, Typography pins.

Download The afterlives of specimens EPUB

This collection addresses an intriguing, important, and novel theme: the biographies of animals through their lives but especially after their deaths, primarily as museum specimens.

This book is very original, well researched, and thought-provoking. The diverse backgrounds of. A 3-star book review. Thomas Pierce's debut novel 'The Afterlives' is about a young man who "dies" and comes back to life. A 3-star book review.

Mental health tips. This collection addresses an intriguing, important, and novel theme: the biographies of animals through their lives but especially after their deaths, primarily as museum specimens.

This book is very original, well researched, and thought-provoking. Thomas Pierce was born and raised in South is the author of the forthcoming novel, The Afterlives, and the acclaimed story collection, Hall of Small stories have appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Oxford American, and elsewhere.A recipient of the National Book Foundation's 5 Under 35 Award, he is a graduate of the University of Virginia creative writing program.

The Afterlives of Specimens: Walt Whitman and the Army Medical Museum. By Tuggle, Lindsay. Floyd Stovall American Book Company, PS PRIMARY SOURCE A primary source is a work that is being studied, or that provides first-hand or direct evidence on a topic.

Common types of primary sources include works of literature, historical. More than just museum specimens, these animals have attained a second life as historical and cultural records. This collection of essays--from a broad array of contributors, including anthropologists, curators, fine artists, geographers, historians, and journalists--comprises short "biographies" of a number of famous taxidermized animals.

The Afterlives In Thomas Pierece's The Afterlives, a year-old man dies — except not really, because suddenly there's a question of what's real, what isn't, and .The fame of these beasts during their lifetimes has given them an iconic status in death. More than just museum specimens, these animals have attained a second life as historical and cultural records.Wildlife occurs within ecosystems, while the afterlives accounted for in this book are enacted in and through (human) social systems.

In the museum, it is the visitor who breathes new life into objects, and, in the case of representations of once-living organisms, that “new life” is .